Welcome to the Australian National Maritime Museum in language resource.

 

When you see this logo in the museum, you may wish to activate the QR code and read more about the exhibition or vessel in your language, at the place the QR code appears.

Languages QR Code




Museum Self-Guided Highlight tours

 

Tour Durations

 

We have recommended pathways of self-guided tours through the museum:

  

30min tour

  • Walk past the boats and learn about the vessels.
  • Choose one vessel to climb aboard, either the Destroyer, Submarine or Tall Ship.
  • Visit our exhibition, Shaped by the Sea.

 

60min tour

  • Climb aboard our submarine HMAS Onslow and
  • Climb aboard our tall ship HMB Endeavour,
  • Visit our exhibition, Shaped by the Sea.

 

90min tour 

  • Climb aboard our vessels (boats and ships) including:
    • the submarine HMAS Onslow
    • the Destroyer HMAS Vampire
    • the tall ship HMB Endeavour
    • sailing ship Duyfken.
  • Visit our exhibition Shaped by the Sea
  • Explore the other galleries and exhibitions in the museum





Shaped by the Sea exhibition Self-Guided Highlight Tours







   

Self-Guided Highlight Tour - Shaped by the Sea exhibition

 

Stop 1: Acknowledgement of Country

 

 

• Australia is home to many Aboriginal peoples who have lived on this continent for tens of thousands of years.

• The Australian National Maritime Museum acknowledges the Gadigal people of the Eora nation as the Traditional Custodians of the bamal (earth) and badu (waters) on which we work.

• We also acknowledge all Traditional Custodians of the land and waters throughout Australia and pay our respects to them and their cultures, and to Elders past and present.

 

 

 

 Stop 2: Shaped by the Sea – Entrance Near Foyer

 

 

• Shaped by the Sea is a major exhibition from the Australian National Maritime Museum. It tells the story of our island continent, its coasts and rivers, and its peoples.

• Shaped by the Sea includes ancient stories that describe the rising of the seas around Australia’s coastlines. These Aboriginal perspectives are shared with scientific explanations of coastal inundation and sea level rise after the last Ice Age. Two different systems of knowledge are threaded through one story of deep time Australia.

• The exhibition’s design approach takes inspiration from the idea of the sea as a living being. The gallery reflects the movement of water – enjoy its flows and eddies on a journey that connects the land, sea and sky.

• Shaped by the Sea acknowledges and embraces many ways of knowing our past. It highlights the importance of incorporating the presence of living cultural knowledges where seas and rivers can be imbued with social and spiritual connections. These understandings enrich those purely derived from science, archaeology or history.

• The exhibition is informed by traditional knowledges and practices of Australia’s First Peoples, who have lived with and sustained our oceans and waterways for countless generations. Equally it acknowledges that other traditions also foster deep attachments to rivers and waters.

• Shaped by the Sea helps awaken and acknowledge these points of connection, for Australians and for all peoples.

 

 

 

 Stop 3: Shaped by the Sea – SEA and Dhaŋaŋ Dhukarr

 

 

SEA

This is the story of mapping, charting and understanding coasts, waterways and sea country.

• We listen to different perspectives on how many people have mapped and charted our coasts and rivers. European cartography from the 1700s can be compared with a river map on a possum skin cloak created by cultural leaders from the Yorta Yorta people.

• We can see how seas and rivers have been harvested for millennia, including the making of shell fish hooks that are on display.

 

 

Dhaŋaŋ Dhukarr ‘Many Pathways’

• A central aspect of the exhibition is Dhaŋaŋ Dhukarr or ‘Many Pathways’ by the Mulka project of North eastern Arnhem Land. This is the traditional home of the Yolŋu people.

• Land, sea and sky converge in the central space called Dhaŋaŋ Dhukarr (Many Pathways) in Yolŋu Dhuwaya language. This is an experience that demonstrates how many of the knowledges represented in the exhibition are not written down in books or depicted in a linear historical manner.

• Aboriginal peoples’ knowledges of Australia’s ecological past are preserved in song, performance and symbolic motifs. They are shared here to help us appreciate Indigenous knowledges, in a way that community members choose to represent their story to audiences today.

• The land, sea, and sky of the Yolŋu world are expressed through the song lines of the various Yirritja and Dhuwa clans. The elemental forms they represent are depicted by The Mulka Project, working with senior traditional artists and Yolŋu digital artists.

• This stunning installation by the Mulka Project is a cyclic reflection on deep time in Australia. As the Mulka Project describe it, Dhaŋaŋ Dhukarr is symbolic of the collective clans represented within the work and the journeys of their songlines performed throughout its cycle.

 

 

 

Stop 4: Shaped by the Sea – Land

 

 

LAND

• Many Australians now understand what Aboriginal people mean when they talk about ‘Country’. Country is not just about land or the earth. It is the sense of place as a living being that shapes and is shaped by the people who dwell on it.

• Our modern understanding of the appearance of the Australian continent is quite different to how the ancestors of the many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples have seen continental Australia in the past.

• Where once was wetlands are today arid deserts. Mountain tops have become islands. Vast stretches of our coastlines, which sustained generations of families, are today submerged deep beneath the ocean.

• In the exhibition, our journey through ‘Land’ carries us to the reefs where scientists have taken slices of coral to understand thousands of years of sea level changes.

• In the same place we learn from Yidinji dancers of northern Queensland, who perform a story about how their ancestors walked where the Great Barrier Reef now lives, until the sea level rose after the last Ice Age.

 

 

 

Stop 5: Shaped by the Sea - Sky

 

 

SKY

 

• These are stories of navigation.

• The view from the sky – whether in Aboriginal paintings or in satellite imagery – reminds us that our coastline is not a wall. It is a way of marking that the land continues under the sea, always interacting with each other. These are the deep truths of deep time that we can all share, regardless of our cultural backgrounds.

• This gallery asks us to think about how we find our way in time and space, based on what we see in the skies.

• Ilma refers both to ceremonies performed by Bardi people and to hand-held objects used to teach stories, songs and law. They can be thought of as navigational instruments and way finding points and depict knowledge of journeys, ancestral and modern in much the same way satellites follow pathways across continents.

• Dugong hunters from Zenadth Kes (Torres Strait Islands) use the moon and stars to find and hunt their prey while modern satellites help us safely navigate the ocean.

• Marvel at a bronze sculpture by artist Alick Tipoti known as Kisay Dhangal (dhangal means dugong in Kala Lagaw Ya language) from Zenadth Kes (Torres Strait Islands). Inscribed with traditional motifs and pearl shell, Kisay Dhangal reflects the life cycle and feeding patterns of the dhangal.

 

 

  

Stop 6: Shaped by the Sea – Entrance Panel closest to Learning Centre

 

 

• Shaped by the Sea is a new major exhibition from the Australian National Maritime Museum. It tells the story of our island continent, its coasts and rivers, and its peoples.

• Shaped by the Sea includes ancient stories that describe the rising of the seas around Australia’s coastlines. These Aboriginal perspectives are shared with scientific explanations of coastal inundation and sea level rise after the last Ice Age. Two different systems of knowledge are threaded through one story of deep time Australia.

• The exhibition’s design approach takes inspiration from the idea of the sea as a living being. The gallery reflects the movement of water – enjoy its flows and eddies on a journey that connects the land, sea and sky.

 

• Shaped by the Sea acknowledges and embraces many ways of knowing our past. It highlights the importance of incorporating the presence of living cultural knowledges where seas and rivers can be imbued with social and spiritual connections. These understandings enrich those purely derived from science, archaeology or history.

• The exhibition is informed by traditional knowledges and practices of Australia’s First Peoples, who have lived with and sustained our oceans and waterways for countless generations. Equally it acknowledges that other traditions also foster deep attachments to rivers and waters.

• Shaped by the Sea helps awaken and acknowledge these points of connection, for Australians and for all peoples.